About these ads

Archive

Archive for the ‘Internet’ Category

Links!

October 31, 2012 Leave a comment

I’ve finally added to my sidebar, all the other radio- and audio-related blogs I read. If you like what you see here, go check some of them out for more of the same!

About these ads

Twitter failed. Hard.

July 26, 2012 Leave a comment

So badly, in fact, it looks like their scripting mark-up isn’t even being processed.

 

Not what I expected to see from such a web giant.

via Boing Boing

Free Mapping and Tracking for Android [My Tracks]

May 29, 2012 Leave a comment

Beautiful weather has finally arrived in the Pacific Northwest and I’ve been taking advantage of it as often as I have time. One thing about living where it’s grey and rainy for so much of the year, it really almost forces me to go outside and be active when it’s nice out. I’ve been riding my bike around, and wanted an easy way to keep track of my stats like speed, distance, which trails I was riding and altitude. Turns out there’s a free and easy way that integrates well with Android: Google My Tracks

My Tracks uses your phone’s GPS to record your position and plots it on a map, where you can upload it to Google Maps or export your track as an industry-standard KML file for analysis in another application.

You get a print out of your statistics at the end, and can optionally insert markers with interval statistics on a custom schedule. The app has been around for a few years but has become much easier to use lately. My last ride was 12.9 miles long at an average moving speed of 7.5 miles per hour:

Total distance: 20.78 km (12.9 mi)
Total time: 2:56:35
Moving time: 1:43:56
Average speed: 7.06 km/h (4.4 mi/h)
Average moving speed: 11.99 km/h (7.5 mi/h)
Max speed: 34.62 km/h (21.5 mi/h)
Average pace: 8.50 min/km (13.7 min/mi)
Average moving pace: 5.00 min/km (8.1 min/mi)
Min pace: 1.73 min/km (2.8 min/mi)
Max elevation: 179 m (589 ft)
Min elevation: 93 m (304 ft)
Elevation gain: 984 m (3228 ft)
Max grade: 12 %
Min grade: -17 %
Recorded: 5/26/2012 12:21 PM

The application also integrates with a Polar brand heart rate monitor over Bluetooth to record heart rate statistics along with the other information. I don’t have that option yet, but plan to add it fairly soon. This is a great free app that everyone should know about. It’s not just useful for mapping a trail, either – you could use it to mark where you left your car, see where you’ve been in an amusement park, or record the location of interesting landmarks you see while wandering around the city. Check it out!

My Tracks

Don’t Let Congress Destroy the Internet

November 16, 2011 Leave a comment

I tend to stay away from political commentary on my blog, but this is too important not to talk about. The PROTECT IP act currently the subject of hearings in Washington, D.C. is set up for a fast-track to pass. Testimony from the technology industry is being prohibited in the committee, so technologists and infrastructure companies aren’t being allowed to have any say in the bill that will effectively set up the “Great Firewall of America” and allow Hollywood to become the ultimate arbiters of what content isn’t allowed to be posted online, backed up by the Department of Homeland Security. Unless the possibility of spending five years in Federal prison because you posted a video of yourself singing a cover of a pop song to YouTube is something you enjoy, it’s time to take action.

Send this form letter, or write your Congressman a personal message. Don’t let the Government, in partnership with the entertainment industry, execute a power grab possibly exceeded only by the PATRIOT act.

Google just killed Google Reader – and they don’t even understand why.

November 1, 2011 Leave a comment

Yesterday, Google officially rolled out the “much anticipated” (by them, perhaps) revisions to Google Reader which removed most of its compelling functionality and added integration with their social network Google+.

We hope you’ll like the new Reader (and Google+) as much as we do, but we understand that some of you may not. Retiring Reader’s sharing features wasn’t a decision that we made lightly, but in the end, it helps us focus on fewer areas, and build an even better experience across all of Google.

I’ll start off with the glaringly obvious usability features. The first one, of course, was best expressed by an anonymous Internet comment that it “looks like a browser with the stylesheets turned off”. It’s mostly white, with a handful of navigation buttons around the top, and an excessive amount of whitespace. The navigation buttons have been rearranged and are in a row along the top, where the previous and next item buttons were previously at the bottom, and the new code doesn’t prefetch as well or scroll as smoothly. Result? It takes a lot longer to get through items. This is a big problem if you use Reader like I do. I skim the contents of about 250 feeds every day, for between 1000 and 2000 news items, but only spend time reading the most interesting ones. It’s taking me between 2-4x as long to get through my unread items as it did previously.

The worst issue, though, is that it’s removed the social functionality from Reader and forces you to use Google+ for your news item discussion. The discussion about this fact seems to center about the fact that it’s not obvious about how to share your new items, to the point where former Google Reader product manager Brian Shih trashes the new revision:

“It’s as if whoever made the update did so without ever actually using the product to, you know, read something. Reader is a product built to consume information, quickly. We designed it to be very good at that one thing. G+ is an experience built around browsing (similar to Facebook) and socializing. Taking the UI paradigm for G+ and mashing it onto Reader without any apparent regard for the underlying function is awful and it shows,” says Brian.

Google, of course, attempts to counter this argument but completely misses the mark. They released a nice blog post showing how to share an item more easily, because it’s a bit non-obvious.

The fundamental flaw, though, isn’t that it’s more challenging to share an article. The real flaw is that it’s now 100% more difficult to actually have a social discussion about the articles you’ve shared.

“Old” Google Reader had a convenient view of showing who was in your sharing circle and highlighting comments they’d made, seen in this WebProNews screenshot:

“New” Reader completely lacks any commenting functionality built in. This means you need to visit 2 different web sites to have a discussion. One web site to read and share the content, and another web site to talk about it with your friends. That’s a 100% increase in the number of steps needed to have a discussion. Trying to make reading the news more social by making it more difficult to have a conversation about the items, is extremely counter-intuitive  at best. Mostly, though, it just reinforces what Brian Shih said above: that they don’t know what they’re doing.

Reader Comment threads were something I looked forward to every day. They’ve been effectively eliminated from my life at this point. Many of the people following my Reader feed specifically preferred not to sign up for Google+, and even the ones who are “users” of Google+ use it in the sense they log in once a week to see how little content there is and feel better about not using it.

I’m not surprised they’ve taken this approach to drive new traffic to Google+ – it’s been in a pretty sharp decline since it was released. They just waited too long between announcing it, and opening it to the public, combined with the fact that it makes a lot of people nervous to have one company with complete access to e-mail, web search behavior, photos and social networking all in one place. Facebook is enough of a privacy nightmare, being specifically designed to break European data protection laws (things we don’t have in the United States) but at least they can’t read my e-mail, too.

I really think this is the end of my time on Reader. Many of the people I previously talked to, just won’t be signing up for Google+ to continue using it. I have no reason to use Reader in Google+ if I don’t have anyone to talk to, and my Reader shares have always been restricted to a very close-knit, hand selected group of people. Now I’m looking for an open-source replacement we can migrate to on an open server. If anyone knows of one, let me know.

Goodbye, Google Reader. We’ll all miss you. And I don’t think Google is going to learn anything from this experience, either.

October Projects

October 3, 2011 1 comment

September was a good month for projects. I accomplished all the things I set out to do and more:

I have a few projects queued up for October which should be equally interesting.
There’s a Sanyo 2050 that I’m working on for a friend, it needs the controls cleaned:
I’ll be repairing my 1941 GE LF-116 console radio that’s been a display piece in my office for about a year. Pre-War FM Consoles are relatively rare, this is yet another one the Radio Museum doesn’t have a photo of, so I’m especially excited to repair this one and contribute the photos to the collection. Personally, I find this style of radio to be less attractive and interesting than others – post-1940 most consoles started to look all the same – but the fact it has the earlyFM band makes it interesting enough from an engineering perspective to offset the aesthetics.
Along with the GE radio, I need to refurbish my EICO 460 oscilloscope to do a full FM alignment on this radio – so I’ll be replacing the capacitors, out of spec resistors and any weak tubes. It “works” currently but it’s unstable, it’s only a matter of time before it stops working. I’ll have to recalibrate it as well.

This is kind of novel… [Meta]

September 24, 2011 Leave a comment

In addition to writing once in a while, I read a lot of blogs. They’re about a quarter political, a good bunch of news, about a quarter are photo feeds, and the rest are life interest and hobbies.

One of the more interesting ones is “Art of Manliness” which runs all manner of short and frequently humorous how-tos on topics like shaving with a straight razor, catching a horse, fixing things on your car, you get the picture. They recently put up a great article about re-purposing a broken antique radio into an external speaker for an MP3 player.

When I encounter a broken antique radio, my first instinct is to fix it up and add an input for the iPod but sometimes they’re just too far gone to save or aren’t valuable enough to spend a dozen or more hours repairing. In that case, tapping into the radio’s volume control and re-using its existing speaker is a good alternative and is usually a reversible modification. A lot of purists might complain about ruining an antique to make this repair, but it’s a reversible modification and let’s face it – fixing the radio up well enough to receive a signal and then using an AM transmitter isn’t going to sound nearly as good most of the time, anyway.

Around WW2, they changed how antique radio speakers work. Before then, speakers were electrodynamic using a field coil instead of a magnet. Since they have no magnetic field if they’re not fully powered by a very high voltage, they won’t play sound – you need a permanent magnet speaker. I mentioned this to the author and he updated the copy of the page to reflect this important information that might have resulted in a lot of disappointment for someone who used the wrong type without knowing:

Important Note: Commenter J.W. Koebel brought to our attention that if you want to use the radio’s original speaker like we do in this project , the speaker needs to be a permanent magnet speaker. Radios from about the mid-1940s and on should have permanent magnet speakers. Earlier radios used electrodynamic speakers. Our amp won’t work with electrodynamic speakers.

How do you know if your old-time radio has permanent magnet speakers? Check the back of the speaker. If it has 2 or 3 wires going to the speaker, it’s a permanent magnet speaker.

Source

Better-known gadget blog Lifehacker picked up the story, and devoted about 1/4 of their summary article’s copy to that same warning.

Two caveats: Make sure your vintage radio is not terribly valuable before you take it apart and also make sure the speaker in the old radio is a permanent magnetic speaker and not an earlier electrodynamic speaker that won’t work with the new amp. If 2 or 3 wires are connected to the speaker, it’s a permanent magnetic speaker.

Source

That’s pretty cool. I didn’t think much of it at the time, but I’m glad some of my advice will help fellow hobbyists have a successful project. (Also, this is my blog’s 100th post!)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 81 other followers

%d bloggers like this: